The Holy Week Schedule

Holy Week Schedule 2019 (PDF)

As last year, All Saints has the privilege to use the rites of Holy Week prior to the reforms in 1955, granted by a limited indult to the Fraternity of St. Peter. Some noticeable changes will be in the increased length of the Passion narratives, which begin with the Last Supper, thus tying together the institution of the Holy Eucharist and the Crucifixion as one and the same sacrifice. On Good Friday, Holy Communion is only received by the celebrating priest, who alone stands at that liturgy in persona Christi; as it is the day our Lord died, the Church bids the attending faithful to fast from reception of Holy Communion, which in striking fashion brings out the absence of Christ. And the Holy Saturday liturgy is conducted during the day.

Further information and some excellent catechesis can be found online at www.pre1955holyweek.com.

As was announced, along with solemn Masses throughout the week, we will be blessed to have Bishop Cozzens celebrate the Mass for Holy Thursday; Bishop Joseph Perry, an auxiliary of Chicago and good friend to the Fraternity, will celebrate the liturgies on Good Friday and Holy Saturday. The 10:30 morning Mass on Easter Sunday will include an small orchestra, as was done at Christmas.

Please note that the seat belt sign is on.

Good Friday

Fast and Abstinence

Current Church laws binds anyone between the ages of 21-59 to the fast, which permits for one (meatless) meal and two lighter supplements; eating between meals is not permitted; water, black coffee, or tea do not break the fast. Abstinence from meat and meat products applies to anyone 14 years and older.

Park and Walk

While cleanup of the Parish Center debris should be near completion, it is possible that the parking lot may not be available by Good Friday. Parking on Good Friday may be a little more challenging since the Webster school is in session. The lot at Webster can be utilized outside of school hours. When parking on the street, please be sure not to block the driveways of the local residents. Thank you for your attention and patience in these regards.

Holy Week

As last year, All Saints has the privilege to use the rites of Holy Week prior to the reforms in 1955, granted by a limited indult to the Fraternity of St. Peter. Some noticeable changes will be in the increased length of the Passion narratives, which begin with the Last Supper, thus tying together the institution of the Holy Eucharist and the Crucifixion as one and the same sacrifice. On Good Friday, Holy Communion is only received by the celebrating priest, who alone stands at that liturgy in persona Christi; as it is the day our Lord died, the Church bids the attending faithful to fast from reception of Holy Communion, which in striking fashion brings out the absence of Christ. And the Holy Saturday liturgy is conducted during the day. Further information and some excellent catechesis can be found online at www.pre1955holyweek.com.

As was announced, along with solemn Masses throughout the week, we will be blessed to have Bishop Cozzens celebrate the Mass for Holy Thursday; Bishop Joseph Perry, an auxiliary of Chicago and good friend to the Fraternity, will celebrate the liturgies on Good Friday and Holy Saturday. The 10:30 morning Mass on Easter Sunday will include an small orchestra, as was done at Christmas.

We welcome sixth-year seminarian Brendan Boyce who will assist with the ceremonies and Masses throughout the week. Other seminarians from the local seminary, as well as some local priests, will also visit through the week. All are strongly encouraged to make the most of this week as possible, as we pray with the Church through our Lord’s suffering and death for our salvation. By the grace of God, much is able to be offered liturgically here at All Saints, so consider at least attending the Sacred Triduum. And if at all possible, even with some inconvenience, take Good Friday off from work and attend the afternoon devotions and liturgies; it is the day our Lord died.

Season of Passiontide

The last two weeks of Lent comprise the season of Passiontide. As the Church directs her attention in earnest to the sufferings of our Lord, in a sense she now goes into mourning. Anything of joyful sentiment is completely subdued: the statues are draped in violet; the psalm Judica me is omitted at the prayers at the foot of the altar; and the Gloria Patri is absent throughout the Mass, indicating the grave offense against the Holy Trinity through the ploys to arrest and crucify our Savior. Passiontide serves as a great opportunity to renew the resolve of our Lenten penances, which sometimes tends to wane as Lent progresses.

Current Church Discipline for Penance During Lent

Law of Abstinence – Begins on one’s 14th birthday; Abstinence from flesh meat.

Days of Abstinence – Ash Wednesday and all Fridays of Lent

Law of Fasting – Applies to everyone aged 18 to 59; Only one full meal may be taken, but two smaller meals that do not add to one full meal may also be taken.

Days of Fasting – Ash Wednesday and Good Friday

Days of Penance – All days of Lent are obligatory days of penance on which some suitable penance should be done, the exceptions being Sundays and the Solemnities of St. Joseph (transferred to March 20) and the Annunciation of the Blessed Virgin Mary (March 25).

*All are encouraged to be generous in their Lenten Penances. For the former Church discipline for Lent, see the FSSP Liturgical Calendar.